This post is the fifth in a multi-part series on prenuptial and postnuptial agreements. If you haven’t read parts 1-4 in our marital agreement series yet, I recommend you do before continuing.

Who needs a marital agreement? (continued)

If you want to ease the transition in the event of divorce a marital agreement can be a great way to achieve that. Most people are uncomfortable acknowledging the possibility that their marriage might not last, but there is a distinct chance that it won’t. A marital agreement can save many hours and thousands of dollars in attorneys fees if you do end up divorcing.

couple on their wedding day pictured. Marital agreement

If one or both spouses own their own business then a prenup or postnup might be a good idea. Without the protection a marital agreement can provide, the business may have to be sold off to settle the divorce, or the ownership situation could get complicated and dramatic.

The “pet prenup” – While it might sound a bit strange at first, this kind of marital agreement is gaining in popularity. In the eyes of the law, pets are just another item of personal property, subject to division upon dissolution of the marriage. A prenup or postnup can clarify who will retain doggy custody, or can cover almost any other issue that’s important to the couple – so long as the provisions it contains are fair and reasonable.

Marital agreements aren’t just for the wealthy

As you can tell by now, there are many reasons why a soon to be married or just married couple might want to consider a marital agreement, even if neither of them are ultra wealthy.

PJ Hartman is a family law specialist with over 15 years of experience. She can help you craft an agreement that will protect your best interests and even strengthen your marriage.

If you want to learn more about what a marital agreement can do for you, or you’re ready to get started, give our office a call to set up an appointment!